Do you know that there are various views that you can use in order see and read your MS Word files better? Maybe for the longest time you’ve only been using the Print Layout view (of which there’s totally nothing wrong about it) and certainly there are viewing features you can use in MS Word 2010 and 2013 depending on the kind of document that you have.


The Print Layout view in MS Word, I would say, is the best view that you can use when you are creating compositions or any kind of document since it gives you a ready shot of how your document will look like the moment it is printed. But you found out that by pressing the CTRL key on your keyboard, together with the scrolling of your index finger on the rolling wheel at the middle of your computer mouse, it directly affects the size of the letters you see on your screen when you’re reading your Word files. The only downside is that when you make the fonts bigger, you’d have to scroll left and right using the bar at the bottom of the document. It adds a few little extra efforts when you can have the option of seeing everything in one view when the texts are in “Word Wrap” mode.


That option becomes possible when you use the “View” options at the menu bar of MS Word, particularly pointing to the “Full Screen Reading” and “Web Layout.” The former is good when you are reading poems, short stories, business letters and other desktop publishing files. It allows you to open the document in bigger fonts without the need for left and right scrolling at the bottom bar, therefore making you more focused on the content and possibly empowering you to point out mistakes or fine print details of the document.


You can use the “Web Layout” view feature when you want your MS Word document look like that of a website. This is good for scrutinizing contracts, business plans, affidavits and agreements, as well as certificates. It provides a wider and outstretched view of the document that enables you to read faster the long narration or the detailed paragraphs of a material. This view also needs no utilization of the bottom scroll bar no matter how big the font size on the screen as it’s also in a “Word Wrap” mode.


These maybe are just simple tips but not many people are utilizing it. In fact, the first time I encountered the “Full Screen Reading” view, I got lost in my own document, having not known its useful advantage. Expect more of these useful tips on your favorite productivity tools only here in - where the best deals are found and guaranteed service from our helpful staff.



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